Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Pre Note’s to My life Diary’s.

            From other source’s

[I]ATTACHMENT TO MY LIFE

FOR THE BENNEFIT OF THIS ACCOUNT I WILL REFER:

TO JOHN IGO, GREAT GRANDFATHER AS No1

JOHN IGO GRANDFATHER AS No 2.

           ANYTHING I ADD WILL BE IN RED AND SIGNED TONY.  ALSO SPELLING OF SURNAMES THAT MAYBE SPELT DIFFERENTLY I WILL MARK WITH A? EXCEPT FOR IGO, WHICH IS CORRECT IN THIS CONTEXT BUT ON, A TRACE TO IRELAND MAY BE SPELT IGOE?

                               TONY

THESE NOTES ARE FROM RECCOLLECTIONS OF THE PAST BY BETTY IGO AND WROTE DOWN BY MAUREEN IGO; THEY ARE ONLY ROUGH DATES TO BE CONFIRMED.

1999

DEAR TONY,

AS REQUESTED A FEW DETAILS FROM LIZ REGARDING “THE FAMILY TREE”.  HOWEVER THE DATE’S ARE ALL GUESSWORK, ALSO LIZ WHO IS NOW 82 YRS OLD IS VERY CONFUSED NOW. 

WE ARE A GORMLESS LOT FANCY NOT KNOWING THE AGE OF OUR FATHER, BUT THE PITY

IS THAT HE WAS BORN AT ALL!  WE WERE SO BUSY LIVING AND HAVING A GOOD TIME THAT THE PAST WAS A DEAD WORLD, BUT NOW IT’S TO LATE, WE WOULD ALL LIKE TO FILL IN THE GAP’S.  PERSONNALLY {MAUREEN} WOULD LIKE TO TRACE ALL THE WOMEN IN THE FAMILY TO SEE IF THERE ARE ANY TRAIT’S.

   LOVE MAUREEN

 

P.S.  BY THE ABOVE ACCOUNT THE FATHER MY GRANDDAD WHO WAS A DRUNKARD TREATED THE GIRLS BADLY.  THAT’S WHY WHEN THEIR MOTHER DIED EARLY THE GIRL’S MOVED AWAY TO LIVE TOGETHER AND COMPLETELY SHUT OUT THEIR FATHER. 

JOHN IGO 2, WHO I NOW BELIEVE, WAS BURIED IN MOSTON CEMETRY ABOUT 1960-1962.  AGE ABOUT 60?

TONY

RESUME:

JOHN IGO 1 BORN APROX 1840-1850?

JOHN IGO 1 + PARTNER ELLEN CAMBELL? HAD ONE BOY CALLED JOHN IGO 2.  BORN WE THINK CO, MAYO 1890?

ELLEN CAMBELL? MAY HAVE BEEN FROM NORTHRN IRELAND BECAUSE CAMBELL? IS A SCOT’S NAME TRADITIONALLY.

ELLEN CAMBELL HAD TWO DAUGHTER’S FROM A PREVIOUS RELATIONSHIP.  THEY WERE;

                        NAME

                        MARY.

                        KATIE

           THESE WERE OUR FATHER’S STEPSISTER’S.

          

           KATIE NEVER MARRIED. 

          

           MARY MARRIED MICHAEL SNEE AND HAD THREE CHILDREN.  THEY WERE;

                        NAME.                                     BORN                                      DECEASED                             AGE

                        ELLEN.                                    1912                                         1986-1987                                              76?

                        CATHERINE.                          1913                                         1997                                         84

                        (ALWAYS’S CALLED HERSELF KATHLEEN)

                        MICHAEL.                              1919?

 

           THESE POOR PEOPLE AS CHILDREN WERE PUT INTO HOME’S BECAUSE THEIR MOTHER WAS AN ALCOHOLIC AND THE FATHER WORKED AWAY, ON THE ROADWORK’S.  THEY HAD AWFUL TIME’S IN CHILDHOOD.

           THERE’S A FINE OLD TALE, WHICH COULD BE A “ SNEE’S” TALE NOT A “ IGO’S” ABOUT A IMMIGRANT GRANDPARENT FROM IRELAND, AS MOST OF THE STARVING IMMIGRANT’S DID, THEY BROUGHT A PIG OVER WITH THEM.  ONE DAY A PIG ESCAPED AT LIVERPOOL DOCK’S AND CAUSED MAYHAM.  THE LOCAL LIVERPOOL ECHO RAN A FEATURE ABOUT “PADDY’S PIG!”.  SOMEBODY WAS SUPPOSED TO HAVE A COPY OF THE NEWSPAPER BUT WE NEVER SAW IT. 

          

 

 

 

 

 

           OUR FATHER JOHN IGO 2, HAD AN OLD AUNT CALLED HANNAH WHO WAS A NUN IN A LIVERPOOL CONVENT.  MY MOTHER MAY REMEMBER MORE.  WYNNE REMEMBER’S THAT SHE GAVE HER A HUGE BUNCH OF RAMBLING ROSE’S FOR HER 13th BIRTHDAY.

           JOHN IGO 2 MARRIED:  HARRIET CHARLTON.  BORN 1890? FROM KING’S LYNNE? BURIED 7TH DEC 1938.  THEY WERE MARRIED 1910? AND HAD 10 CHILDREN, 4 BOYS AND 6 GIRL’S.  THEY WERE;

NAME                                      BORN                                        DECEASED

BRIDGET                                1911.                                                     ?

ELIZEBETH ELLEN              1912.

JOHN IGO 3                           1913.

HARRIET                                1920.

JAMES                                    1922?

WILFRED                               1924                DIED AT THE AGE OF 4 AFTER A ACCIDENT. 

                                                                           BURIED JAN 28TH 1928

EILEEN                                    1923

WILLIAM                               1926

WYNNE                                   1927

MAUREEN                              1929

 

           OUR MOTHER HARRIET CHARLTON HAD THREE SISTER’S AND ONE BROTHER.  THEY WERE;

NAME

LUCY.

NETTA.  (DIED AS A CHILD)

ALICE.

ALBERT.

 

           ALICE MARRIED A FRUITERER AND VEG MAN CALLED JOHN LEEMAN.  THEY HAD THREE CHILDREN.

                     NAME

                     JOHN.

                     TOM.

                     NETTA.

 

           ALBERT MARRIED LILY? AND HAD ONE DAUGHTER.

                     NAME.

                     AUDREY.

 

           LUCY MARRIED JAMES SIDDALL.  AND HAD SIX CHILDREN.  THREE GIRLS AND THREE BOYS.

                     NAME.

                     NELLY.

                     NETTA.

                     JIMMY.

                     ALBERT.

                     DORIS.

                     RONNIE.

           ALL THE ABOVE CHILDREN ARE OUR COUSIN’S.


 

my LIFE.  By Tony Hillier

DATED 1998

In the beginning.  Let there be light: 

FAMILY HISTORY

TONY’S FAMILY TREE                                           GLEN’S FAMILY TREE

 

MOTHER’S SIDE                                                                    MOTHER’S SIDE

 

Great Great Grandfather.

Igo. 

Ireland.  (No known details)

 

Great Grandfather                                                     

John Igo. 

Born 1840-1850?  County Mayo, Ireland.

Died?

                   +

Great Grandmother

Ellen Campbell? 

Born 1840?  County Mayo, Ireland.

Died?

Children:

John Igo. (Stepsister’s Mary and Katie Campbell) 

 

Grandfather                                                                               Grandfather           

John Igo.                                                                                    Jack Glover           

Born 1890?  Manchester.  England?                                       Born?

Died 1962?                                                                                Died?

                   +                                                                                      +

 

Grandmother                                                                             Grandmother

Harriet Charlton.                                                                       Sarah Jane?

Born 1890?  South of England.                                                 Born?

Died                                                                                           Died

Children:                                                                                    Children,

Bridgett Igo, Betty Igo, Harriet Igo.  Maureen Igo.               Lillian Glover.  Mary Glover. 

Wynne Igo, Eileen Igo, John Igo, Jim Igo, Bill Igo.                Jim Glover  Dorothy Glover.

 

 

Note.

The Igo Tree finishes here for my family, But will carry on elsewhere.

Tony                        

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Igo line to Hillier and Glover to Lloyd to Hillier

 

 

Parent.  Mother                                                                         Parent.  Mother

Harriet Igo.                                                                                Lillian Glover.

Born 3/3/1920.  Manchester, England.                                    Born 3/2/192?

Died                                                                                           Died?

                 +                                                                                           +

Parent.  Father                                                                          Parent.  Father

Tom Hillier.                                                                               Arthur Lloyd.

Born 14/2/1920.  Manchester, England                                   Born 5/2/192?

Died                                                                                           Died

Children:                                                                                    Children:

Anthony Thomas Hillier, Brian James Hillier,                        Francis Ann Lloyd.

Catherine Teresa Hillier, Peter John Hillier,                          David Arthur Lloyd.

                                                                                                   Glennis Yvonne Lloyd.

 

              Anthony Thomas Hillier.  3/7/1947.       +     Glennis Yvonne Lloyd. 21/12/1947.

Children;

Karen Jane Hillier.  Joanne Hillier.  Allison Denise Hillier.

 

Karen Hillier                                        Joanne Hillier                               Allison Hillier

Born 6/4/1970.  Tameside                   Born 4/2/1971 Tameside              Born 25/6/1975 Tameside

         +                                                          +                                                +

John Mullin                                          John Milne

Born                                                     Born                                             

Children                                               Children                                           Children

Jade Rebecca Mullin.                         ANDrew Paul Milne                       Rhiannon Sarah Hillier

Born 24/7/1998 Tameside                   Born 10/3/1999                                Born 21/3/1995

Jake Mason Mullin.                                      

Born 14/12/1999

 

 

 


 

 

 

Before I begin with my own life, I will insert here a small chronicle of notes that my mother wrote.   I will try to write it down has my mother wrote the notes.

 

CHRONICLE OF  MY LIFE

               BY

                                          HARRIET IGO

 

        I STARTED TO WRITE THIS SHORT CHRONICLE OF MY LIFE IN JUNE 1986.   IT MAY BE OF INTREST TO MY GRANDCHILDREN.

 

        MY NAME IS HARRIOT HILLIER, NEE IGO.  I WAS BORN IN ANCOATS, MANCHESTER ON THE 3rd MARCH 1920.   I WAS THE 4th CHILD OF AN EVENTUAL TOTAL OF 10 CHILDREN, 6 GIRLS AND 4 BOYS.

        WE MOVED TO CHORLTON - UPON - MEDLOCK NEAR THE CITY CENTRE OF MANCHESTER.   MY EARLIEST MEMORIE’S ARE OF SMALL THREE-STORY HOUSE IN A SMALL BACK STREET, WHERE 10 CHILDREN SLEPT IN ONE BEDROOM.   WE SLEPT 5 TO A BED.  

        ONE OF MY EARLIEST PLEASANT RECCOLLECTIONS WAS WHEN I WENT TO BED OF A NIGHT I LOOKED TOWARDS A SMALL LANDING AT THE TOP OF THE STAIRS AND SAW A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN, WHICH I NOW REALISE WAS ONLY A DREAMS.   (FUNNILY ENOUGH ONE OF MY SONS BECAME A GARDENER.  ALSO ONE DAY I LOOKED AT THE GARDEN OF MY 3RD HOME AND REALISED MY DREAM HAD COME TRUE.)  THERE WAS NOT A BLADE OF GRASS IN OUR AREA WHERE WE LIVED.   ONCE I RISKED BEING PUNISHED BY GOING DOWN A PASSAGE TO HAVE A LOOK AT SOME PLANTS.  

        I AM AT PRESENT 66 YEARS OLD AND STILL LOVE TO DO SOME WORK IN THE GARDEN.

        MY FATHER, WAS THE SON OF JOHN IGO, WHO ARRIVED IN ENGLAND FROM COUNTY MAYO, IRELAND.   HE WAS ALSO CALLED JOHN IGO.   MY GRANDFATHER TRADED IN SECOND HAND FURNITURE, WHICH HE BOUGHT FROM THE WELL TO DO OF MANCHESTER, THEN SOLD IT TO THE POOR COMMUNITY, MOST BOUGHT IT ON TICK, SO THOUGH IT WAS A THRIVING BUSINNESS HE ENDED UP A POOR HAS HIS CUSTOMERS.  

        MY FATHER MARRIED MY MOTHER WHO WAS A ENGLISH WOMAN FROM KINGS LYNNE, NORFOLK.  

        BEING THE 4th CHILD LIFE WAS A BIT EASIER THAN MY OLDER SISTER, BECAUSE THEY HAD TO GO OUT WITH A HAND CART AND SELL FIREWOOD THAT MY GRANDFATHER CHOPPED ON A BIG CHOPPING BLOCK. 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

WE HAD A DRUNKEN FATHER, BUT OUR MOTHER WAS WONDERFUL, AS SHE WAS OFTEN SHORT OF MONEY WE NEVER WENT HUNGRY AND SHE MADE SURE WE WERE WELL MANNERED, AND KEPT US CLEAN AND TIDY.   IT WASN’T EASY IN SUCH CRAMPED CONDITIONS.   WHEN WE WERE ILL WE WERE PUT TO BED AND MADE A FUSS OF.   WE HAD A MARVELOUS DOCTOR BURKE WHO VISITED US ON A PONY AND TRAP.   HE HAD A LADY WHO COLLECTED A FEW COPPERS A WEEK FOR HIS SERVICES.   HE HAD A NUMBER OF SONS, ONE OF WHICH BECAME MY OWN DOCTOR IN LATER YEARS.  (HE WAS A SAINT IN MY OPPINION NOTHING WAS TOO MUCH TROUBLE FOR HIM).   ANOTHER SON BECAME A BISHOP.  

        HAS CHILDREN WE ALL ATTENDED ST AUGUSTINES CATHOLIC SCHOOL AND CHURCH IN THE HEART OF MANCHESTER.   WE OWE A LOT TO THE TEACHER’S WHO WERE DEDICATED  AND GAVE US A VERY GOOD EDUCATION AND A LOVE OF READING. 

        I LIVED IN A HOUSE IN A SMALL BACK ST, BUT IT WAS A HIVE OF ACTIVITY.   THER WAS A PAINTER AND DECORATING FIRM AND TWO FRENCH POLISHING SHOP’S IN THE ST.   THER WAS A PUB ON THE CORNER AND A VARIETY OF SHOP’S ON THE MAIN RD NEARBY.   WE HAD A CATMEAT SHOP THAT ONLY HAD A BIG PIECE OF MEAT CALLED PLUCK, WHICH PEOPLE BOUGHT FOR THE CAT’S.   WE HAD OLD MR KIRBY THE HERBALLIST WHO HAD CHESTER CAKE’S UNDER GLASS IN THE WINDOW, THE LOCAL BOY’S USED TO BUY THEM WHEN THEY WERE HUNGRY EVEN THOUGH THE CAKE’S HAD BEEN THERE FOR WEEK’S.   WE HAD A JEWISH COBBLER CALLED MR ROSE  AND A COLLECTION OF OTHER SHOP’S.   SO AS CHILDREN WE WERE NEVER BORED BECAUSE OF THE ACTIVITY OF PEOPLE COMING AND GOING CALLING AT THE SHOP’S AND THE SHOPKEEPER’S USED TO CHAT TO US.

        SOMETIME IN 1930’S THE NEWPAPER PUBLISHER’S BUILT THERE PRINTER’S AT THE END OF OUR ST, IT WAS CALLED THE DAILY HERALD AND BECAUSE IT WAS A VERY HOT AND THIRSTY WORK, THE MEN WERE ALLOWED OUT FOR A DRINK AT DINNER, THEY USED TO RACE DOWN THE ST TO THE PUB.   I OFTEN WONDERED HOW THE PAPER’S EVER GOT PUBLISHED.

        MR JONE’S AND MR JACKSON WHO OWNED THE DECORATING FIRM WERE VERY KIND TO THE RESIDENT’S OF WOOD ST WEST.   WE CHILDREN USED TO PLAY IN THE STREET, AND I SUPPOSE WE LOOKED SCRUFFY URCHIN’S AT TIME’S, BUT IF ONE OF THESE FINE GENTLEMEN WERE GOING ON BUISNESS THEY WOULD PILE US IN THEIR CAR’S AND TAKE US INTO THE COUNTRY, WHICH I THOUGHT WAS WONDERFUL.   EVERY CHRISTMAS EVERY HOUSE IN THE ST WOULD RECEIVE ABAG OF FRUIT AND GOOD’S FROM THESE MEN AND IF ANY OF THE LOCAL BOY’S GOT IN TROUBLE WITH THE POLICE THESE MEN WOULD STAND BY THEM AND EVEN GIVE THEM JOB’S.

        I LEFT SCHOOL AT 14 YRS OF AGE, AND WENT TO A MACHINING FACTORY.   IT WAS VERY HARD WORK AND VERY POOR WAGE’S.   I DID MACHINE WORK FOR 6 YEAR’S.  

 

 

 

WHEN I WAS 18 YRS OLD THERE WAS A WAR SCARE WITH GERMANY.   WE HAD 12 MONTH’S OF PEACE, WHICH ENABLED US TO GET READY IN CASE HITLER TURNED NASTY, WHICH HE DID IN 1939.   WHEN WAR WAS DECLARED.  

SEPTEMBER 1939.  ENGLAND DECLARED WAR AGAINST GERMANY.

THIS WAS CALLED THE 2nd WORLD WAR.

        HITTLER HAD BEEN PERSICUTING THE JEW’S FOR YEAR’S AND PUTTING THEM IN CONCENTRATION CAMP’S WHERE EVENTUALLY MILLION’S WERE EXTERMINATED IN THE GAS CHAMBERS.   WE NEVER KNEW ANY OF THIS UNTIL AFTER THE WAR

        WHEN I WAS 21 YEAR’S OLD I WAS CONSCRIPTED FOR WAR WORK.   I WORKED IN TRAFFORD PARK AT METRO VICK’SHELPING TO MAKE AUTOMATIC PILOT’S FOR PLANE’S.   I DID THIS JOB FOR 6 YEAR’S.

        ALL OUR FAMILY SURVIVED THE WAR.   WE HAD GOOD TIME’S AS WELL AS BAD TIME’S.   THE FIRST YEAR’S OF THE WAR DIDN’T EFFECT US VERY MUCH.   THEN WE STARTED HAVING OUR TOWN’S HEAVILY BLITZED (Bombed) WHICH WAS TERRIBLE.   MANCHESTER HAD A VERY BAD BLITZ AT CHRISTMAS 1942?  .   ONCE ME AND MY FRIEND ELLEN ARMSTRONG, WHO I STILL KEEP IN TOUCH WITH, AND IS NOW CALLED MRS DAVIS, WERE AT THE APPOLLO CINEMA ON A SUNDAY NIGHT LISTENING TO A CONCERT.  THE DANCE BANDLEADER WAS OSKA RABIN.   WHEN THE BLITZ STARTED THE BAND KEPT PLAYING FOR AS LONG AS IT COULD.   WE WERE NOT WARNED HOW BAD THE BLITZ WAS.   WE CAME OUT OF THE CINEMA TO HUNDRE’S OF INCENDIARY BOMB’S FALLING DOWN ON US AND EVERBODY PANICKING.   LONDON AND COVENTRY WERE THE TWO CITIE’S CONSTANTLY BOMBED.

        ALSO ALTHOUGH WE WERE EXTREMLY POOR WE WERE ALL VERY INTELLIGENT AND MANAGED TO WORK HARD AND GET OUR OWN HOME’S 

SO IN MY 60 YEARS, PROGRESS HAS MADE GREAT STRIDES NOT ALLWAYS FOR THE BETTER.   THE LOCAL COUNCILS PROVIDED US WITH BEAUTIFUL COUNCIL HOUSES,  AND WE TOOK GREAT PRIDE IN THEM STILL BEING A COUNCIL TENENT AFTER 30 YEARS AND NOW IN MY SEVENTY’S OUR GENERATION TRY TO MAINTAIN OUR PROPERTY.   BUT I’M SORRY TO SAY MOST COUNCIL ESTATES ARE IN WORSE CONDITION THAN THE SLUMS OF THE 1940’S. 

NOTE. LOT OF MISSING YEARS HERE.   MY MOTHER NOW JUMPS TO 1970.

          Tony

1970.   WE NOW LIVE ON A HOUSING ESTATE IN PARTINGTON, NEAR URMSTON ABOUT 10 MILE’S OUTSIDE MANCHESTER.  

MY SECOND SON BRIAN GOT A JOB AT AN ENGINEERING FIRM IN CADDISHEAD.   THE ONLY WAY TO GET THERE WAS TO GO OVER THE MANCHESTER SHIP CANAL ON A FERRYBOAT.   THE OLD FERRYBOAT USED TO BE SKULLED ACROSS, BUT NOW WE HAVE A MODERN MOTOR BOAT.   WHEN BRIAN WAS 18 YEAR’S OLD TRAGEDY TOOK HIM AWAY FROM US.   HE HAD GONE TO WORK AS USUAL, BUT WHEN THEY GOT TO THE FERRY THERE WAS A THICK MIST OVER THE WATER THE FERRYMAN WOULD NOT TAKE THEM OVER, SO THE MEN DECIDED TO SKULL ACROSS BUT THEY GOT INTO DIFFICULTY SO THE FERRYMAN HAD TO GO AFTER THEM IN THE MOTOR LAUNCH WHICH IGNITED THE MIST ON THE CANAL.

 

THE OUTCOME OF THE INQUIRY WAS THAT A SHIP THAT WAS UNLOADING CHEMICAL’S AT PETROCHEMICALS FACTORY, DEVELOPED A LEAK INTO THE SHIP CANAL WHICH NO ONE SAW.   6 MEN WERE KILLED INCLUDING MY SON BRIAN, AND ALSO THE FERRYMAN WHO WENT TO THERE AID, AND 3 MEN WERE BADLY BURNED BUT SURVIVED.   MY HUSBAND AND I RECEIVED THE PRINCLY SUM OF £500, FOR THE GRIEF MY FAMILY SUFFERED.   THE SUM WAS LOW BECAUSE WE WERE NOT DEPENDENT ON BRIAN.   THE RESIDENT’S OF PARTINGTON WERE VERY KIND TO US, ALSO THEY RAISED A DONATION OF £500.

THE YEAR IS NOW 1990 AND WE HAVE HAD A TORY GOVERNMENT FOR 11 YEARS.   I WAS A LUKE WARM SOCIALIST UNTIL OUR FIRST LADY PRIME MINISTER TOOK OFFICE 11 YEAR’S AGO.   SHE CUT LOCAL COUNCIL SPENDING, CAUSING COUNCIL ESTATE’S TO DETERIATE AND I REALISEDSHE DEFINATLY WAS NOT FOR THE WORKING CLASS.   THEN HER GOVERNMENT CREATED A NEW TAX ON HOUSE’S CALLED ‘ POLL TAX’ THIS PUT A VERY HIGH TAX BURDEN ON ALL THE LOWER PAID. 

IT IS NOW JAN 2nd 1994, SO I MUST PUSH ON WITH THIS DIARY.   I WILL BE 74 0N 3rd MARCH.   I HAVE HAD A VERY HAPPY CHRISTMAS  AND NEW YEAR, PLENTY OF DRINK AND FOOD AND MY FAMILY AND FRIEND’S AROUND, PLUS LOT’S OF PENSIONER’S PARTY’S.

I STILL LIVE IN PARTINGTON, 23 YEAR’S NOW AND I DON’T THINK I’LL EVER LEAVE.  PEOPLE KNOCK ESTATE’S BUT MOSTOF THE YOUNGSTER’S  AND PEOPLE IN MY AGE GROUP ARE THE SALT OF THE EARTH.

     

 THE ABOVE NOTE’S WERE GIVEN TO ME TO TYPE UP.   I DECIDED TO PUT THEM

 IN MY OWN, MY LIFE DIARY, 1N 1999. 

                        Tony

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My parents were married on 26/12/46.  I was born 3rd day of July 1947.  In a small terraced house in

Craven St. In the district of Hulme, Manchester, Lancashire.  My parents were married just after the 2nd world war. 

             My mother is called Harriet, maiden name Igo, and came from a large family of 6 girls and 3 boys. 

             My father is called Tom Hillier he had no background because he was fostered by his stepparents John and Sarah. 

             I only remember certain things which will not be in order:

             I remember waking my parents up one Christmas morning, with a drum.  I recall the music at night, coming from the pubs.

             The big event of my life then was the coronation of Elizabeth to queen.  We had all the streets decked with bunting, and crowns painted on the walls.  I remember going with lots of people to watch the coronation on a Television, which was in a shop.  This was a historic moment for us, because television had only just been invented. 

             I recall my first brother Brian, sitting on the steps of our house with me, we both had a coronation mug and Brian broke his.

             I think in the early days, we had my mother’s mother living with us.  I do not remember her, but my father told me that just after she died, my parents heard a knock on the door, when my father answered it there was no one there, but a figure in the distance.

                Bonfire nights were big occasions, everybody went to the local fire.  The fun for the bigger lads like me, was pinching other lad’s bongy wood.

             I can remember the name of my first school, it was St Wilfreds catholic junior.

             My memories of junior school are very limited:

             My recollections are;

I recall we sat on long wooden benches for our dinner.  One day the bench was lifted up and came down with one of the legs on my big toe.  I was not treated for it and it is still swollen today.

2.       We were once playing some silly game where we were crawling about on our hands and knees and I

accidentally put my hand on a wasp and it stung me.

3.  Having to go to sleep in little canvas beds.

4.  In my last year another school coming to our at playtime and causing a snow fight

Us kids used to love the special days when the men went on their days out.  We would all go to the pub they

were going from and wait for them to throw us coppers.  (Half pennies and pennies)

I vaguely recall going on a trip to the seaside.  We played i. spy and I had my parents

guessing on the letter U, which I said was all in the Charra (Bus) they had to give in, and were annoyed for me to give them the answer of Umans.(Humans) .

My dad once took me on his bike, I sat on the crossbar he kept saying keep your feet

Away from the front wheel, but I eventually put my feet in the wheel and we came a cropper.  We were not that bad but my dad came out the worse.

In the year of 1955.  We moved into a downstairs flat, in Brooklands estate, Wythenshaw. 

These estates were concept of rehousing people from slum and old areas to large open country areas far away from the city and friends.  This was to change the old traditional communities and society completely. The flats were on Warmley Rd and called Elizabeth Yarwood house.  I grew up here till I was a teenager. 

They were good times.  I went to St Aiden’s catholic junior school.  We used to walk it there and

back, about 3 miles each way.  Buses were a luxury.

The first and best friend I had was a lad of my age, his name was Hughie Delarghey.  He only had

a Father who was a retired teacher.  He had lost his Mother, and had a sister Mary, who was the oldest and another younger sister.  We were both brought up strict Catholics. Another School pal was Eddie Madden who I lost touch with after I left St Columba’s.  At school they indoctrinated us with the catholic faith, every morning at school we had to learn the catechism.  Hughie more strict than me, he be came a alter boy, and he learnt me Latin of mass, and the lords prayer which I knew then off by heart.  We were good mates and all the stuff lads did.  The funniest thing I remember was: One night we slept out in a tent, and my mother gave me a key so I could come in the house if things went wrong.  In the early hours I woke up with something cold and moving about in my sock, which I took off and through out of the tent, in the morning I picked up my sock and found the problem inside my sock was the key my mother gave me.  Hughie’s father died, so he had to move to a uncles a long way away.

NOTE.  I regret fully, never saw Hughie again.  Many years later about 1990 I wondered

how to get in touch with him, but did not.  Just after this my mother told me he had died and he lived just near me in Droylsden.  He had become a teacher.  I now work with Eddie Madden.

 

 

 

 

I think I read my first books about now, and was my last serious attempt until I started work on the buses.

The Two books were:

Robin Hood by

Alice in Wonderland by Robert Lewis Stevenson.

They both had a strong effect on me.

The only other material I read were comics like:

The Beano.  Superman.  Beezer

I can remember 4 bad incidents that occurred:

The first one happened just before Christmas.  Me and my brother Brian slept in the back bedroom, and we had a Christmas tree in the bedroom, it had little mettle candlestick holders so I decided to put in some candles and light them, obviously the candle flame set fire to the tree, I stood in the corner of the room with the burning tree in my hands screaming for help.  I think my mother ran in and grabbed the tree and ran out with the tree.

The second incident, concerned my pet hamster had two golden hamsters plus a baby cream hamster, which my friend John Chapman gave me after he had bred fourteen baby hamsters.  Some of them cream .One day I had my hamsters running about on the grass in front of the flats, my cream one had strayed, so I went looking for it and went and stood on its head.  I cried that night, saying I was a murderer.

About this time, me and my pals decided to club together to form a animal club.  The first one we bought was a grass snake.  We could not get it to eat, we gave it small dead fish, but it would not eat them, so it soon died.  We found out after that we should have gave it live food.

The Third incident concerned our new baby sister Catherine, who slept in the front bedroom with me and Brian.  I slept in a bed on one side, and Brian and Cath slept on the other side of the room in bunk beds.  One night after lights out I decided to throw my wooden darts at Brian’s wall and he returned them.  My mother heard funny bump or thud noises, and came flying in, screaming how stupid we were throwing darts right over Cath.

The Fourth incident was about our Brian.  He was out on his paper round when a American boy knocked him down on his bike.  We took Brian to hospital, he had a broken leg, unfortunately my mother had given Brian a cup of tea so they could not reset the leg for 3 hours.

Talking of accidents, the Fifth incident concerned me.  I had to go to the doctors for my first two stitches in my right thumb, it happened while riding my boggy, which was simply the wheel base of a old pram.  I just trapped my thumb between a other boggy.

I remember the buses that used to pass our flats.  We hardly went on them, but when we did my dad would buy a daily ticket.(when he had finished with it he would pass it on).The bus company was North Western.  The seats upstairs were in long rows, with a aisle at the side.

At school I can only remember one lesson that I enjoyed.  The class was put into teams and had to choose a tree and put anything to do with the tree into a scrapbook.  We did the Oak tree.  It was very interesting.  We had someone draw it.  We collected leaves and Fruits, and wrote about any thing that lived on it.  I think this got me into Birds and Wildlife.

One embarrassing thing was asking my Mum to buy me Y front underpants, the old type were that long you had to wear them with turn ups. 

By now we had a Black and White television.  Most of the time all that was on was interludes, which were pictures to put on the screen while waiting for a programme.  The favourite children’s programmes then were a series called watch with mother, they included:

MUFFIN THE MULE

andY PandY and LULU

THE WOODEN TOPS

BILL and BEN THE FLOWER POT MEN

One of the adverts I remember off T.V then was a toothpaste commercial that went like this:

You’ll wonder where the yellow went,

When you brush your teeth with PEPSEDDENT.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I developed my three hobbies during this period.  They were:

                                      Egg collecting.   Stamp collecting.   Fishing.

My first egg was taken from a nest in a hedge in Wythenshaw Park.  It was a Hedge Sparrows, small and light

blue.  I carried it all day with me then on the way home, fell and broke it.  Egg collecting then was not as serious as now. 

There were plenty of birds.  We also had a code to take only one egg.  {Maybe with hindsight it created people to take

eggs from rarer species with no moral code}.  I would recommend that you go to the Manchester university museum to

see their collection).  You always get the bad Apples.  Many a time while out nesting, you came across a ragged nest

(that is a nest that as been destroyed) I could never understand this.  I had quite a fair egg collection which were in

sawdust in biscuit tins, until one day my mother whilst cleaning knocked them all over.

A most unusual thing happened to me one day.  I was walking around the chicken farm fence at the back of the

flats, when a starling landed and laid a egg, then flew off.  Hard to believe but true. 

Happy times.  I used to go fishing on moor lane ponds.  There were three of them, one bigger than the others. 

One sunny summers day, I was walking around the big pond and noticed all the fish on the surface, mainly Mirror Carp,

the colours were breath taking.  One of my most vivid memories.

My first fish was caught on the Brooklands canal it was a small Roach, which I took home in a baby milk mettle

container.  I put it in the bath in ordinary tap water.  It was dead in the morning. 

The most exciting fish I caught was a Crucian Carp, in the small pond.  This fish is small and golden brown

coloured.  PS its funny how your younger days, everything seems bigger, and the summers were

nicer or were they compared to today’s no seasons. 

I used to be a paper boy for a newsagent on Warmly Rd, and the money helped, and for extra cash I ran errands

for a coloured nurse over the road, She was called Mrs Dickens.  She told me if I kept doing errands for her, she would

buy me a new fishing rod for Christmas.  She did, and I chose mettle telescopic one.  

My telescopic rod served me well, but it did develop a small fault, the tip section used to come out, so before I

would cast off I tightened it up.  Unfortunately Brian did not know this and one day he, borrowed it with out my

knowledge, and lost the tip.

My stamp collection was, by today’s missing old British stamps, quite good.  The stamps I had then were really

quite common then (but not now). 

The stamps I liked most were from Poland, and Magyar (Hungary).  My rarest stamp, especially today, was a

small one from a country called Saar.  I joined an approval stamp club where you got a book of good quality stamps

that you had to sell, your commission was a stamp of your choice, the only trouble was you did all the buying.  My

mother sent them back with a nasty letter.  I think I swapped what was left of my egg collection for some stamps. 

Looking back we also had in them days lots of picture cards you got them in everything, but the

common one was toffee cigarettes.  The pictures covered animals, film stars, sports stars, cars, planes, and many more. 

They would be worth some money today, not only because of their rarity but for their quality. 

Some games we played then were:

Hopscotch, where you marked out 10 squares numbered 1 to 10 starting with 1 and 2 together (2 squares)

and 3 on its own.   You started with the slate on no 1 and hoped on number 2, and staying on one leg picked up the slate,

then you went to the last numbers and back by either hopping on the single numbers or putting one foot on each

numbered square that formed a double square.

Another game we played was a game using either picture cards or cigarette packets.  (Cigarette packets in them

days had a outer case which covered the inner sleeve that held the cigarettes) the outer sleeve was flattened and then

could be thrown. Again these cards were by today’s standards very attractive and of good quality.

           With names like:

             Woodbine, Capstan, Players , Senior Service, Park Drive, Black Cat. 

The game consisted of throwing a card each towards a wall, then each person threw another card and tried to

land one on top of the already thrown cards, any cards that got covered you won.

Marbles or Allies, was the most popular game.  Marbles or Allies were small round glass balls with various

colours inside, some were common colours but some were rarer, these you tried to win if any were thrown in a game. 

Some were larger, and were called Daubers.  Some were silver ball bearings.

There were two games:

One game was played on grass or dirt, and you made a small depression in the ground.  Then you stood several

feet away and you each rolled a marble toward the hole with the front side of your finger, like golf, you released several

marbles each, then you took it in turns to push the marble into the hole, the one who gets the last marble in the hole wins

all the marbles in the hole.  To make it harder near the hole your opponent could say little finger, you then were told

either to push with your little finger on top of the marble or with your finger tip.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The other marble game started with all of each others marbles put in a solid ring, then you aimed a marble at the

ring to break them up.  Then you took it in turns to aim a marble at another marble if you hit it you claimed it. 

Another game was conkers.  (The conker is the hard brown seed of the Horse Chestnut tree. 

                                         The Latin name is Aeculus Hippocastanum.)

You put a hole in the conker and threaded a piece of string through the hole with a knot on the bottom. 

Two played the game, you held the string steady and your opponent had to hit it, when he missed you had a go.  The aim

was to smash the conker.  Some tricks to make the conker tougher was to either soak it in vinegar or put it in the oven. 

For each conker that another conker smashed it increased by 1 or added any number that the other conker had, i.e.  if a

sixer was smashed by a oner the wining conker became a sevener. 

Lollipop sticks was again used for a game of two.  One held the stick horizontal and the opponent hit it with their stick.  The aim was to break the lolly stick.  One way to make them tougher was to soak the

stick in water.

We sometimes went swimming at either The Galleon or Castleton outdoor pools. 

One day at the Galleon I was on the raft and was kicked off, and got stuck under it.  I had to be rescued by a

lifeguard.

We used to go to the pictures on Saturday mornings, it was for the boy and girls of the ABC picture house. 

One day after the pictures, I was with our Brian, when I saw a stack of electric train lines for sale at 3d, I went into

the shop for what I thought was a bargain only to be given 1 train line.  I realised then what ea. meant.

Educational note: d was the old sign for pence.  £.  s. d.  Pounds.  Shillings.  Pence

The coins were:

2 Farthings = Halfpenny.  
2 Half Penny’s = 1 Pence.
2 Three penny bits = Sixpence.
        12 Pence = 1 Shilling.
2 Tanners (sixpenny pieces)= 1 Shilling. 
           2 Shillings = 1 Florin.

2 Shillings and Sixpence (2/6 ) = Half Crown . 

5 Shilling’s = Crown.  10 Shillings = 10 Bob note. 

2 Ten Bob notes = 1 Pound.

1 Guinea which = 1 pound, 1 Shilling.

How did we survive in those days:

To keep our feet warm, we cut the corner off brown paper bags, and put them over our toes, over the socks.

To keep our ears warm we wore Balliclavers, which were knitted hoods, which started at the neck, and covered

all of your head except your eyes.

             Me and Brian joined a shop savings club near our school St Wilfreds, to buy my Mam and Dad a box of liquors

for Christmas. 

I also joined the cubs.  It was expensive for my parents because you had to have the full uniform. 

In my last year I was selected to run for the school to run cross country at a other school we got no help getting

there, I don’t think I ran for school again, but I do recall a period then when I used to run around the green across the

road, I just ran round and round, in plimsolls.( white flat pumps.)

What did we eat for sweets:

Well there was kaoli, (a sherbet powder) you bought it out of a large jar and it was put in little paper bags.  You

then wet your finger and stuck it in the kaoli and licked it off or if you could afford it you bought a penny liquorice

stick and stuck this in the powder.  l used to buy mine from a shop around the corner that was run by a blind lady.  You

could not kid her with money, she ran her fingers round the edge of the coins. 

I bought wagon wheels off a ice cream van called Grenellis.  They seemed bigger then.

We used to suck gob suckers and aniseed balls, arrowroot (which you chewed like eating a piece of wood.)

A favourite treat I used to like was on a Thursday.  My mother used to buy her groceries from a mobile van, and

she always bought Kit Kats.  I still remember the taste, which was different than today’s Kit Kat. 

Another favourite was dripping butties.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I remember going visiting with a friends parents down somewhere in Manchester, and we went in the street and

played with the pitch (tar) which ran in squares in the road and melted on hot days.  Our hands were a mess, and

margarine had to be applied to the hands to get the pitch off.

One funny thing happened about bonfire time.  We made a very big Guy Fawk with a mans coat and trousers on. 

We propped it up in the hall recess where you hung your coats.  When my dad came home he got the biggest scare of his

life has he hung up his coat.

My dad worked in a factory as an engineer (a turner).  But for extra money he used to be a pool’s collector. 

You got commission on the amount you collected.  I used to go round on a Friday night collecting from houses. 

One weekend after the pools agent had been and took in the coupons for the deadline, my dad found two coupons

in his work coat, belonging to work mates , he aged that weekend.  Luckily they did not get any draws.

My dad had a sit up and beg bike, which he gave to me.  We just left it outside the flat.  One night it went missing

we reported it to the police.  A bit later we were told it might be worth going down to town to the lost property office, which we did.  (The policeman on duty told my dad unofficially if we see a bike like ours to say that’s it, theyhad that many).  We saw one just like ours and my dad said to me is that it and I said no because it had no pump with it, ours did when it was stolen.  My dad cursed me.

My dad add a allotment and my Mam used to send me down to lift some potatoes while my dad was at work. 

At weekends he would go up to the allotment and come back complaining some ones been pinching his spuds.  I don’t

think he ever found out. 

Near these allotments was a brook, which I spent many happy days, mainly trying to catch catfish. 

On one very hot day after being at the Brook, I went home and was very ill, I think I had  got sunstroke.

             When I was about 10yr.’s old a lad called Peter Ried asked me why my hair was so out of date.  He had

greasy hair with a quiff. 

             I can only remember Three occasions that really should have changed me but did not:

First moment was me and who ever was my mates then, went to see the film Expresso Bongo with Cliff Richard’s,

the pop star in it.  I don’t know how we got in because it was for X rated.  It was good.

The second moment was dancing with my brother Brian to a record on the radio called:

Running Bear.  by Johnny Preston. 

The Third occasion was when I went on a camping holiday with school, in Ilfracombe Cornwall, and listening to

all the bigger boys and girls with their transistors playing the big hit of the day, ;

             Cathy’s Clown.  By the Everly Brothers.

The holiday was a camping holiday on a farmer’s field.  and the toilets were large chemical drums.

My life was about to change dramatically:

I failed my 11 plus.  So I went to St Columbus secondary modern.  I only attended for the first year because we

moved from the flat in Brooklands to a three bedroom house on a new overspill estate called Partington.

I did not complete a full year St Columbus:

I discussed my situation with my mum and decided to stay at St Columbus so my mother bought me a brand new

racing bike, from a shop in Partington that sold everything.  (Shop was called Penningtons).  I cycled to school for a while,

but after getting wet several times I decided to change schools.

Two records in the charts then were:

             1.  What Do You Want To Make Those Eyes at Me For.  By Emile Ford and The Checkmates

             2.  What do you want.  By Adam Faith

Another recollection was concerning my fishing.  I still went fishing after I moved to Partington I either went to

the canal in Broadheath or better still Lymn dam.  After one occasion I left my Maggot tin in the toilet, and after several weeks my mother said it was making a funny noise, so not knowing what Maggots were I open the lid and out came thousands of Bluebottles I had to open a window and drive them out

                  NOTE (Maggots first changes into chrysalis then come out as fly’s.  Metamorphosis).

 

 

 

 

 

Go to Part Two.  My life by Tony.  Teenager of 1960 to Parent 1970 .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



[I] Go To Part Two. My Life by Tony.  Teenager of 1960 to Parent in 1970